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Title III, Part C- Language Instruction  for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students

The purpose of Title III, Part C is to help ensure that children who are limited English proficient, including immigrant children and youth, attain English proficiency, develop high levels of academic attainment in English, and meet the same challenging State academic content and standards.


Blount County Schools

www.blountboe.net

 

EL District Plan

 

 

 

Revised:                      July 2013                                                                     Revised:                      August 2012

Revised:                      January 2012                                                               Revised:                      June 2008

Board Approved:        November 29, 2004                                                    Approved by OCR:    1999 & 2004

Federal Programs Advisory Committee 2013-14

   School Leadership

Appalachian

Karisa Wallace

Parent Liaison

Blountsville

Carol Hays

Counselor

Cleveland High

Denise Martin

Principal

Hayden Primary

Ruth Smith

Media Specialist

Hayden Elementary

Monica Moore

Media Specialist

Hayden Middle

Becky Lary

Counselor

Locust Fork Elementary

Steve Love

Assistant Principal

Locust Fork Elementary

Olen Goble

5th Grade Teacher

Locust Fork High

Tammy McMinn

HS English Teacher

Locust Fork High

Tim Clevenger

Assistant Principal

J.B. Pennington

Judy Fincher

HS Technology Teacher

Southeastern

Marla Hitt

Instructional Aide

Susan Moore Elementary

Partricha Owens

Parent Liaison

Susan Moore Elementary

Teresa Myrick

Kindergarten Teacher

Susan Moore High

Trisha Bodine

HS English Teacher

BCCTC

Brenda Tidwell

Counseling Supervisor

             

                 District Leadership

James E. Carr

Superintendent

 

Rodney Green

Assistant Superintendent

 

Shelli Simmons

Parental Involvement Specialist

 

Amalia Contreras

Home-School Liaison

 

Emily Harris

Social Worker

 

Brenda Hazelrig

Attendance Officer

 

Barbara Robertson

Nursing Supervisor

 

Cindy Williams

Federal Programs Consulting Teacher

 

Craig Sosebee

Federal Programs Coordinator

 

Denise Lybrand

EL Consulting Teacher

 

 

                 Community Stakeholders

Sherry Burns

Assistant District Attorney

Sgt. Fred Cochrun

School Resource Officer Supervisor

Bud Jones

Hope House Director

Tammy Easter

Parent

Sarah Lauderdale

Parent

Denita Atwood

Parent

Regina Vargas

Parent

 

 

 

STATE DEFINITION OF LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT

The state definition of limited English proficient (LEP) is taken from the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, S. 9101, 25, of Title IX:

 
 

“(25) LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT. – The term ‘limited-English proficient’, when used with respect to an individual, means an individual –

(A)    who is aged three through 21

(B)    who is enrolled or preparing to enroll in an elementary school or secondary school;

(C)    (i) who was not born in the United States or whose native language is a language other than English;

                    (ii)(I) who is a Native American or Alaska Native, or a native resident of

    the outlying areas; and

 

                         (II) who comes from an environment where a language other than English has had a significant impact on the individual’s level of English language proficiency; or

 

                     (iii) who is migratory, whose native language is a language other than English, and who comes from an environment where a language other than English is dominant; and

 

              (D)    whose difficulty is speaking, reading, writing, or understanding the English language may be sufficient to deny the individual –

(i)       the ability to meet the State’s proficient level of achievement on State assessments described in Section 1111(b)(3);

(ii)   the ability to successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English; or

(iii)    the opportunity to participate fully in society.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


STATE DEFINITION OF IMMIGRANT: Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB)

 

 
 

Immigrant Student:

ü “individuals who are aged 3 through 21;

ü were not born in any state;

ü have not been attending one or more schools in any one or more states for more than 3 full academic years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


LEGAL CASES RELATING TO ENGLISH LEARNERS

There is federal law established to ensure the rights of national origin minority students. Following is a brief view of major legislation, court rulings, and regulations that address language minority students.

Federal Laws

1964 Civil Rights Act, Title VI

“No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin … be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

 

1968 Constitution of the United States Fourteenth Amendment 

“No state shall … deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

1974  Equal Educational Opportunities Act (EEOA)

“No state shall deny equal educational opportunity to an individual on account of his or her race color, sex, or national origin, by … the failure of an educational agency to take appropriate action to overcome language barriers that impede equal participation by its students in its instructional programs.”

 No Child Left Behind Act – Public Law 10- Titles I and III

“… ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education and reach, at a minimum, proficiency on challenging state academic achievement standards and state academic assessments.”

Federal Courts

1974        Serna v. Portales 

Court ordered schools to make a curriculum available to students who lack English skills.

1978  Cintron v. Brentwood 

EL students are not to be segregated completely from other students, but included in art, PE, and non- language based classes.

Supreme Court

1974  Lau vs. Nichols

A suit filed by Chinese parents inSan Franciscoin 1974 led to a landmark Supreme Court ruling that identical education does not constitute equal education under the Civil Rights Act. The ruling requires school districts to take "affirmative steps" to overcome educational barriers faced by non-English speakers (Lyons, 1992).

 

1982 Plyler vs. Doe

The Supreme Court ruled in Plyler v. Doe [457 U.S. 202 (1982)] that undocumented children and young adults have the same right to attend public schools as U.S. citizens and must attend until they reach mandated age.  In addition, the court ruled that public schools may not:

 

Ø  Deny admission to a student during initial enrollment or at any other time on the basis of undocumented status.

Ø  Treat a student disparately to determine residency.

Ø  Engage in any practice to “chill” the right of access to school.

Ø  Require students or parents to disclose or document their immigration status.

Ø  Make inquiries of students or parents that may expose their undocumented status.

Ø  Require social security numbers from all students, as this may expose undocumented status.

 

 

 

 

981 Castañeda vs. Pickard

In 1981, in the most significant decision regarding the education of language-minority students since Lau v. Nichols, the 5th Circuit Court established a three-pronged test for evaluating programs serving English language learners. According to the Castañeda standard, schools must:

Ø  Base their program on educational theory recognized as sound or considered to be a legitimate experimental strategy;

Ø  Implement the program with resources and personnel necessary to put the theory into practice; and

Ø  Evaluate programs and make adjustments where necessary to ensure that adequate progress is being made. [648 F. 2d 989 (5th Circuit, 1981)].

For more information about these court cases research: Court Cases Impacting Limited English Proficient

Students.

 

 

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Act, Reauthorized January, Section 721

 

Alabama Administrative Code, 290-3-1-.02(7)(c ) through 290-3-102 (7) (i) (iv)

 

Blount County Schools Board Policy

 

Local Blount County Schools Student Handbooks govern procedures and policies of school activities and guidance of all students.

 

PREFACE

This is the comprehensive Blount County Schools English Learners (EL) District Plan in place and in compliance with Section 3116 of Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, for serving students who are immigrant and/or limited English proficient, where one or more students are determined to need support.  The Blount County Schools EL District Plan is to be in place whether or not Blount County Schools currently has English Learners (ELs) enrolled and regardless of Title III eligibility.

 

The Blount County Schools EL District Plan addresses each aspect of the LEA’s program for all ELs, at all grade levels, and in all schools in the school system.  The Blount County Schools EL District Plan contains sufficient detail so that each staff person can understand how the plan is to be implemented and contains the procedural guidance and forms found in Appendix used to carry out responsibilities under the plan. 

 

The BCS EL District Plan is available online (www.blountboe.net) at the Blount County District Website and in each principal and/or counselor’s office at eachBlountCounty school.

 

This plan details how Blount County Schools provide programs, services, and resources to students who are identified as language minority and English Learners (ELs) or students with limited English proficiency (LEP).  Blount County Schools provide appropriate services to EL students at all grade levels and at all schools in the school system.

It is the goal of all school personnel, including EL teachers, regular classroom teachers, special education teachers, gifted education teachers, after school staff, summer school staff, intervention instructors, counselors, and administrators to help each student make yearly progress on standardized evaluations and reach the highest possible levels of English language and academic proficiency in the shortest time possible.

 

ASSURANCES of Title III Supplemental EL Program Administrator and BCS Superintendent

BCS consulted with teachers, school administrators, parents, and education related community groups and institutions of higher education in developing the BCS EL District Plan.

BCS follows ALSDE state guidelines for the implementation of the WIDA English Language Proficiency (ELP) Standards.  WIDA ELP Standards and WIDA Can Do Descriptors booklet copies are available in principal and/or counselor’s office in each BCS school. WIDA ELP Standards and WIDA Can Do Descriptors are readily available to all core and EL teachers in BCS.   The WIDA ELP Standards and Can Do Descriptors are included in each IELP student folder that is provided to all core BCS teachers of ELP students. The complete WIDA Standards and Can Do Standards are available online at www.wida.us.  Also, parent translations for ACCESS test score reports are available at the same site.  These translated ACCESS score reports ensure communication with parents/guardians concerning EL student progress on the ACCESS Test for ELs given each spring.

All teachers in BCS are fluent in English and have written and oral communication skills.  English fluency is considered established if personnel have a teaching certificate issued by the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) and have met the highly qualified status of a teacher or instructional aide that is required by the ALSDE.  

BCS certifies that all teachers in the Title III Supplemental and core language instruction program for LEPs are fluent in English (language of instruction in BCS) because all BCS teachers are certified by the ALSDE certification department. Individuals who apply to the Alabama State Department of Education, Teacher Education and Certification Office, for an Alabama Professional Educator Certificate or alternative approach certificate must meet the requirements of the Alabama Prospective Teacher Testing Program (APTTP) as a precondition for certification. The APTTP consists of basic skills assessments and subject area assessments.

The basic skills assessments of the APTTP measure fundamental skills all prospective educators must possess in the areas of Applied Mathematics, Reading for Information, and Writing. These assessments are administered as part of the ACT WorkKeys System.  Oral English fluency is established in the rigorous employment interview sessions conducted by BCS administration.

 

This ALSDE certification assessment process and the BCS employment interview process certifies that all BCS certified teachers employed are fluent in all four language domains of English.

 

All schools in the LEA are in compliance for serving ELs. Upon enrollment, and as part of the registration process, all parents and/or students must complete a Home Language Survey (HLS), and immediate translation assistance is available if needed to complete the HLS.  All employees providing registrar assistance are trained on official enrollment procedures concerning HLS administration.   As stated in BCS Policy and Procedures Manual. Section 5.1, all language minority students, immigrant students, and/or migrant students must be allowed to attend school immediately regardless of their ability to produce a birth certificate, a social security number, immunization records, or immigration documentation.  Children may not be excluded from school because they do not have a social security number (Plyler v. Doe).  

 

All individuals used as translators or interpreters are fluent in the language they are translating. BCS provides Spanish translations for all school documents, letters to parents, report cards, and other pertinent parent communications.

 

 

 

 

ELs have equal access to appropriate categorical and other programs but not limited to special education, gifted education, and after school care and are selected on the same basis as other students in BCS.

During EACH IELP Committee meeting, the EL staff member and/or EL translator will verbally explain to ensure comprehension of the parent’s and/or guardian’s right to withdraw/waive Title III Supplemental EL program services. If a parent or guardian does not attend the IELP committee meeting, the EL staff member will meet individually, in person or by telephone conference, with each non-attending parent to explain verbally withdrawal/waiving rights of Title III Supplemental EL Program services and mandatory CORE EL Language development instruction. Many BCS/EL parents/guardians struggle with English literacy and native language literacy skills. If a parent or guardian chooses to waive Title III Supplemental EL program services, the parent will be given the BCS “Request for Title III Supplemental English Language Development Program Withdrawal/Wavier Form” immediately in both English, Spanish or other language as needed and translation assistance is provided orally as needed.   Also, parents are made aware that enrollment in CORE EL services and language program testing (ACCESS/W-APT) is MANDATORY. ALL LEP/EL STUDENTS MUST PARTICIPATE IN CORE EL LANGUAGE SERVICES.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A. INTRODUCTION

1) Include the LEA’s educational theory and goals for its program of services.

 

 

GOAL

 

It is the goal of all Blount County School personnel to help each student meet the challenging academic standards and reach the highest possible levels of English language and academic proficiency in the shortest time possible.

 

THEORY AND PRACTICE

 

All EL students will receive core EL instruction by certified teachers in the regular academic program using the ALSDE courses of study and the WIDA English Language Standards approved by the ALSDE.  EL students will receive Title III supplemental EL instruction in the EL pull-out program if not waived by the parent / guardian.  Classroom teachers are trained in Specifically Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) strategies that are scientifically researched-based for the purpose of accommodating content for EL students in the regular education classroom.  Such strategies as building background knowledge, adaptation of text, emphasizing key vocabulary, planning meaningful activities, language functions stated clearly, supplementing materials, using appropriate speech to match language level of student(s), varying teaching techniques and presentation, teacher questioning to foster higher order thinking skills, lesson pacing, and on-going, varied assessment techniques are proven to foster an environment favorable for second language acquisition in regular education classes and supplemental EL pull-out classes. The EL teachers and the regular program teachers also confer on a regular basis concerning the academic progress of EL students regarding individual student needs and sheltered instructional strategies. On going, sustained teacher training strengthens the knowledge-base and skills of teachers in the use of SDAIE strategies in the core regular classrooms and in Title III supplemental EL pull-out classes.

 

The World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Consortium English Language Proficiency Standards for English Language Learners (K-12)

 

These standards have been adopted by the State of Alabamaas a means to align curriculum, instruction, and assessment for ELs.  This program meets the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 by linking English language acquisition standards and state academic content standards.

 

Instructional Framework

 

The profiles of ELs are varied and complex.  In order to meet the needs of these students and achieve the above stated goal, Blount County Schools employ mixture of methodologies in order to best serve the needs of EL students.  The process includes activities such as but not limited to, reviewing ACCESS scores, reviewing available state-mandated test scores, conducting formal and informal language assessment(s), and implementing instructional practices and tools that will benefit ELs.  Information gathering and immediate assessment focuses on some combination of the following: (1) academic experience, (2) English-language proficiency, (3) native-language proficiency, (4) learning and behavioral factors, and (5) environmental factors.  This information is then used to determine and implement effective instructional practices that focus on content (Alabama Course of Study) and language (WIDA  English Language Proficiency Standards for English Language Learners) objectives as well as cultural awareness and study skills necessary to meet the rigorous academic standards required of all BCS students.

B. IDENTIFICATION AND PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

1)      Include the LEA’s procedures for implementing the EL Advisory Committee.

 

FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE

 

The Federal Advisory Committee will meet twice each year for the purpose of program needs, assessment, evaluation, and for further development and revision of the BCS District EL Plan. This committee must include central office administrators, school administrators, school counselors, teachers, and EL staff.  The committee should also include parents and community representatives who work with EL students and their families in other settings.  By working with a group that includes these stakeholders, the LEA can receive valuable input from those whose support and efforts may be important to the success of the English language educational program. The committee should review the overall progress of EL students in Blount County Schools by examining information detailed in the ALSDE Title III Supplemental EL Program Compilation Data Report, reviewing information in the ALSDE AMAOs Title III Reports, considering recommendations from each BCS school level IELP Committee, and reviewing system level and school level ACCESS Test results. After reviewing the data and information, the Committee should suggest data-driven recommendations and needed changes to the BCS EL District Plan and Title III Supplemental EL Program. These recommendations will be presented to the Director of Federal Programs who will then present the recommendations to the BCS superintendent. The BCS superintendent will then present the recommendations to the Board of Education in an updated EL District Plan.

 

All members of the Federal Programs Advisory Committee will observe all rules and laws governing the confidentiality of information concerning individual students. Some examples of committee responsibilities would be to make recommendations regarding:

 

Ø  The English language development program.

Ø  High-quality professional development for all and EL staff.

Ø  Parental involvement programs to further student achievement and student adjustment.

Ø  Budgeting of state, local, and federal funds.

Ø  The English language program evaluation using the ALSDE Title III Supplemental EL Program Compilation Data Report.

 

2) Include the LEA’s methods for identifying and assessing the students to be included in the English language instruction educational program. The following components must be evident in the plan.

·         Home Language Survey

·         WIDA-ACCESS Placement Test (W-APT)

·         EL Committee Placement

 

 

ADMINISTRATIVE REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

 

Enrollment Policy 

 

As stated in BCS Policy and Procedures Manual. Section 5.1, all language minority, immigrant and migrant students must be allowed to attend school regardless of their ability to produce a birth certificate, a social security number, immunization records, or immigration documentation.  Children may not be excluded from school because they do not have a social security number (Plyler v. Doe).  

 

                         

Registration Form – Each school has a registration form to be completed. Registration Forms are available in English and Spanish as well as with the assistance of a translator.

 

Proof of Age - May consist of a valid birth certificate, a valid passport, or other official or unofficial document listing date and place of birth, such as a health certificate, a family Bible, or a written statement from a parent. Enrollment may not be delayed if proof of age is not available. A valid birth certificate is requested, but not required for enrollment.

 

Proof of Immunization – This is not required for enrollment, but parents are asked to submit a State of Alabama Certificate of Immunization as soon as possible.  Parents are informed that a State of Alabama Certificate of Immunization (Blue Slip) is available at the Blount County Health Department or a physician’s office. Translation assistance and appointment assistance is provided if needed to communicate with the Blount County Health Department. The Health Department will assist in establishing a schedule to make immunizations current as quickly as possible. The Health Department will also issue an official immunization certificate that indicates the schedule has been established based on immunization records from other states and other countries.  

 

Social Security Number – A Social Security number is not necessary for enrollment or for school lunch forms. If a student does not have a Social Security card, the appropriate school office staff will assign an identification number.

 

Home Language Survey (HLS) - This is a survey to determine the student’s home language. It is used as an identification tool for potential LEP students and is a part of the enrollment process. The Home Language Survey (HLS) should be signed by the parents of students in grades K-6, but it can be signed by the students or parents in grades 7-12. Immediate translation assistance will be provided during the completion of the HLS as needed. This form identifies the first language spoken by the student, the language spoken in the home, the language the child speaks outside of the home, the language the parent/guardian reads, and the language the student reads. This form will be filed in the permanent record of each student in the school system. If any other language other than English is marked, the registrar submits a copy of the Home Language Survey to the EL teacher immediately to ensure proper assessment of language proficiency and possible placement within the Title III Supplemental EL and Core Programs. However, the presence of a language other than English does not automatically signify that the student is not a competent and proficient speaker of English. The HLS is also used to identify the appropriate language to send school communications to parents/guardians. There is a BCS flow chart that outlines the appropriate pathways for the placement, exiting, and monitoring of an EL student.  

 

When all responses on the HLS indicate that English is the only language used by the student and by individuals in the home, the student is considered an English-only speaker. Procedures established by the school system for placement in the general student population should be followed.

 

Former School Records - BCS request parents or guardians provide former school records, report cards, and/or transcripts that are available from outside theUnited States. The school will make a request for international documents in the appropriate language to the school of last attendance if the parent does not have the records or the ability to obtain such records. BCS will also evaluate and translate records from another country for applicable credits. BCS will request official transcripts and documents from the previous school(s) within theUnited States. No student will be denied enrollment or proper grade placement because former school records cannot be secured.

 

Employment Survey – Each parent/guardian completes a copy of the employment survey at the time of student registration, and the survey is sent to the BCS migrant recruiter/parent liaison at the Blount County Board of Education Resource Center. This form assists the LEA in identifying migrant families. The local school sends the completed forms to the migrant recruiter/parent liaison for immediate follow-up.

 

 

Proof of Residence – A copy of a lease, rental, or purchase agreement for a residence, indicating the address of the residence, is accepted as proof. A copy of a utility bill mailed to the residence is also acceptable. If the student is determined to be homeless, this requirement is waived. Enrollment may not be delayed if proof of residence is not available.

 

·    Registration and health forms should be completed by the parent/guardian and the assistance of a translator will be provided if necessary. All information is necessary including home and emergency telephone numbers. Registration and health forms are also available in Spanish.

 

·   School lunch forms should be completed for each student wishing to apply for free or reduced-priced lunch or breakfast.  Forms are available in Spanish and translation assistance is provided as needed.  Names and social security numbers of all adults living in the household should be listed.  Not issued yet may be written in the space provided for Social Security numbers.  Unemployed may be written in the space provided for income as appropriate.  The absence of a Social Security number or income amount does affect eligibility; the space must simply be marked as None or in the manner listed above.

 

 

 

The LEA will record the registration date as the original entry date in INOW and as the date first enrolled when completing the demographics page of the ACCESS for ELs English Proficiency Test.

 

 

 

HOME LANGUAGE SURVEY (HLS)

 

Upon enrollment, and as part of the registration process, all parents and/or students must complete a Home Language Survey.  If the answers to any of the questions on the survey indicate that the student comes from an environment where a language other than English is spoken, then the guidance counselor or person registering the student must send a copy of the registration form, the home language survey, and/or the IELP placement form (with the top portion completed) to the EL Teacher. (Every student at each school must have a Home Language Survey in his/her Permanent Record File.)

 

The Blount County School System has a full-time, Spanish-speaking parent liaison/translator that is available for interpreting purposes. Also, two other EL staff members are fluent in Spanish and available at their respective schools and other schools as needed. The ultimate goal of this process is to provide parents who do not speak English with immediate and meaningful opportunities to participate in the education of their child. The translators may be called upon to help with enrollment, orientation, parent/teacher conferences, eligibility meetings, IELP Committee meetings, etc. They will also assist schools in translating documents regarding parent programs, meetings, and other activities where a standard Spanish document is not available. If a student or parent speaks a language other than English or Spanish, efforts will be made to find an interpreter to facilitate communication. TheUniversityofAlabamaatBirminghamhas availability to individuals that are fluent in languages other than Spanish and can be contacted if needed for this purpose. Lastly, Transact is also used to aide in communication with parents that do not speak English.

 

 

 

 

WIDA-ACCESS PLACEMENT TEST (W-APT)

 

  • Language minority students identified through the HLS during registration at the beginning of the school year must be assessed for English language proficiency within thirty (30) days of enrollment.  Language minority students who register after the beginning of the school year must be assessed within ten (10) days of enrollment.
  • Current ACCESS Scores will be used for students having transferred from any of the WIDA Consortium States.
  • Any student with yes on their Home Language Survey and no previous ACCESS or W-APT score, will be screened with the W-APT.
  • Initial assessment of English language proficiency must be conducted by appropriate staff members who have completed the appropriate assessment training and certification to administer the ACCESS Tests and/or W-APT to determine the level of English proficiency and to facilitate appropriate instructional and program placement decisions.

·         The W-APT yields an overall composite score based on the four language domains tested. The following guidelines must be adhered to in determining eligibility for placement in the English language instruction educational program:

1.      Any student scoring an overall composite score of 3.9 or below on the W-APT must be

      identified as limited English proficient and will require placement in an English language

      program as directed by ALSDE guidelines

2.      Any student scoring an overall composite score of 4.0* or above on the W-APT may be    

      identified as limited English proficient or as NOMPHLOTE and not placed in the Title III

     Supplemental EL Program as allowed by the ALSDE guidelines.

*The W-APT should be considered as only one piece of evidence in the decision making process regarding placement. Teacher judgment, other assessments, and extenuating circumstances, such as the student’s age and amount and quality of previous schooling, should be factored into the decision.

 

The W-APT and the ACCESS for ELs measure speaking, listening, reading, and writing across the WIDA English Language Proficiency Standards for English Language Learners in Kindergarten through Grade 12 (2007). The WIDA English Language Proficiency (ELP) standards are:

 

1. English language learners communicate in English for SOCIAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL purposes within the school setting.

 

2. English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of LANGUAGE ARTS.

 

3. English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success    

     in the content area of MATHEMATICS.

 

4. English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SCIENCE.

 

5. English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of SOCIAL STUDIES.

 

See www.wida.com for detailed ELP standards and further information.

 

The W-APT and ACCESS for ELLS will be administered in grade level clusters as follows:

Kindergarten

Grades 1-2

Grades 3-5

Grades 6-8

Grades 9-12

 

The W-APT is administered on an individual basis after a student has been initially identified as a potential EL student with the HLS upon enrollment. The score from the W-APT facilitates the IELP Committee’s discussion and decision as to whether a student receives EL services because the W-APT indicates the student’s language proficiency level. The result also facilitates the placement of a student into a Tier for the administration of the ACCESS for ELs. The chart below demonstrates five of the six language levels and demonstrates how each level corresponds with a tier. Level 6 is a proficient level.

 

Understanding the ACCESS for EL’s Test Tier Placement 

ACCESS for ELLs

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                    TIER A is most appropriate for English language learners who: 

·         have arrived in the U.S. or entered school in the U.S. within this academic school year without previous instruction in English, OR

·         currently receive literacy instruction ONLY in their native language, OR

·         have recently tested at the lowest level of English language proficiency.  Tier A includes Levels 1, 2, and 3.

 

TIER B is most appropriate for English language learners who:

·         have social language proficiency and some, but not extensive, academic language proficiency in English, OR

·         have acquired some literacy in English, though have not yet reached grade level literacy.  Tier B includes Levels 2, 3, 4, and 5 depending on the individual child’s ability and need.

 

TIER C is most appropriate for English language learners who:

·         are approaching grade level in literacy and academic language proficiency in the core content areas, OR

·         will likely meet the state’s exit criteria for support services by the end of the academic year.  Tier C includes Levels 3, 4, 5, and 6.

 

The ACCESS for ELs is administered each spring in accordance to the testing calendar set forth by the Alabama State Department of Education. All Kindergarten students are assessed individually. Students in grades 1-12 take the speaking test individually and the listening, reading and writing subtests in small groups with students of the same tier.

 

 

 

EL COMMITTEE PLACEMENT

 

The EL Committee will:

  • Direct the Title III Supplemental EL and Core Program placement in eachBlountCountySchool. 
  • Consist of at least four of the following - Local Education Agency (LEA) representative/administrator, content area teacher, parent, EL teacher, guidance counselor, translator, and other staff as needed. 
  • Assure that parents/guardians leave the IELP meeting understanding the right to waive/withdraw their student from Title III Supplemental EL Program and that the Core EL services and ACCESS testing are mandatory. 
  • Make recommendations concerning the placement of each student in:  an age appropriate grade, in the Title Supplemental EL Program with appropriate accommodations and/or other related services; in the regular education program without accommodations or special services if scoring 4.0 and above on the W-APT or a 4.8 on the  ACCESS Test.
  • Assure that EL students at the secondary level are to be placed in less language dominant classes but not necessarily less challenging classes when beginning to learn English.
  • Decide if it is appropriate to but FLEP students who are not academically succeeding back into the ESL program.
  • See that in the event an EL student is not passing core classes with the EL accommodations afforded the student because of his or her LEP status, the IELP Committee can determine if the academic failure is due to the LEP status.  If the LEP status is not a factor in the failure, there will be a referral to the Problem Solving Team (PST).
  • Recommend and monitor the participation of eligible ELs in any other applicable program; i.e., Title I intervention, gifted, at-risk, homeless migrant, special education, etc.
  • Observe all rules and laws governing the EL student’s Title III Supplemental EL Program placement and academic needs.
  • Assure that ELs are eligible to participate in all academic and special programs on the same basis as the native English-speaking students.
  • Determine best grading procedures for the EL student.

 

 

 

Blount County Schools Title III Supplemental EL staff diligently strives to ensure parental comprehension of all parental rights’ AND details of supplemental and core EL services provided to his/her child. During EACH IELP Committee meeting, the EL staff member and/or EL translator will verbally explain to ensure comprehension of the parent’s and/or guardian’s right to withdraw/waive Title III Supplemental EL program services. If a parent or guardian does not attend the IELP committee meeting, the EL staff member will meet individually, in person or by telephone conference, with each non-attending parent to explain withdrawal/waiving rights of Title III Supplemental EL Program services and mandatory participation in CORE EL language development instruction. If a parent or guardian chooses to waive Title III Supplemental EL program services, the parent will be given the BCS “Request for Title III Supplemental English Language Development Program Withdrawal/Wavier Form” immediately in English, Spanish or other language as needed.   Also, parents are made aware that enrollment in CORE EL services and language program testing (ACCESS/W-APT) is MANDATORY. ALL LEP/EL STUDENTS MUST PARTICIPATE IN CORE EL LANGUAGE SERVICES.

 

 

 

 

 

2)      Include the LEA’s method and procedures for exiting students from the English language instruction educational program and for monitoring their progress for a period of at least two years, and at a minimum, follow SDE exiting requirements for ELs. The State established exit criteria a composite score of 4.8 on the ACCESS for ELLs® English language proficiency test.

 

TITLE III SUPPLEMENTAL EL AND CORE PROGRAM

EXITING PROCEDURES

 

The IELP Committee duties for exiting an EL student from the Title III Supplemental EL Program are as follows:

  • The IELP Committee shall make a recommendation for exiting a student from the Title III Supplemental EL Program based on the above stated criteria: a composite score of 4.8 on the ACCESS Test or ELs.
  • The IELP Plan shall indicate FLEP 1 status, and Exit shall be checked and filed.

ELs will be included in the LEP subgroup for the purpose of accountability until they score a language proficiency level of 4.8 (Composite Score) on ACCESS Test for ELs which is theAlabama’s official English language proficiency test exiting criteria.

 

MONITORING PROCEDURES FOR EXITED ELs

 

Students are classified as Former Limited English Proficient Monitoring Year 1 (FLEP1) during their first year of monitoring, and Former Limited English Proficient Monitoring Year 2 (FLEP2) during their second year of monitoring. Upon successful completion of two years of monitoring, ELs are classified Former Limited English Proficient (FLEP) and they are no longer included in the LEP subgroup for school level EL accountability or program evaluation purposes.

The following is the IELP Committee’s Recommendations for FLEP 1 and FLEP 2 status students:

  • The student has completed the Exit Testing Criteria for the Title III Supplemental EL Program. (ACCESS Score of 4.8)
  • The student will be monitored for two consecutive years.
  • The EL teacher will monitor mid-term grades and report cards.
  • Content Area Teacher(s) will notify the EL Teacher if the student is struggling in the classroom. Collaboration among mainstream teachers and the EL teacher is ongoing.
  • If the FLEP1 or FLEP 2 student is in danger of failing, the student in question will go through RTI procedures.  At this time, if the PST decides that the student is at-risk due to a language proficiency issue, then the IELP Committee will meet to review the data and determine if new English language placement testing is recommended. The W-APT will be administered on the correct level, and the IELP Committee will recommend reentry into the Title III Supplemental EL Program if indicated. If the student scores proficient on the W-APT, the IELP Committee can recommend further alternative evaluation(s) be pursued by the PST.
  • EL teachers in BCS maintain FLEP Teacher Notebooks which include sections for each FLEP 1 and 2 student under monitoring. Within the notebooks the teacher files all pertinent information such as Title III Supplemental EL and Core Program exiting papers, progress reports, report cards, parent notes, emails, conference forms, etc. A review of any student’s pertinent papers in this notebook will reveal academic, social, and/or cultural progress or lack thereof. These notebooks are maintained and filed at the end of the academic year for documentation purposes. The information in the notebooks is also easily accessible and available for review in parent conferences, data meetings, walk-throughs, grade level meetings, and departmental meetings.  

C. PROGRAMS AND INSTRUCTION

1) Describe the programs and activities that will be developed, implemented, and administered to ensure that ELs acquire academic language as part of the core ESL program. 

·         Process the district uses to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment

·         Rationale for selecting the particular ESL program/s and how they are based on scientific research

 

COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT

 

·         A Comprehensive Needs Assessment and Title III Supplemental Services and Core EL Program Evaluation is conducted annually.

·         Results from this assessment, evaluations, ACCESS Test data, and mandated state assessments serve to evaluate, select, and implement the Title III Supplemental EL and Core Programs. 

·         This assessment allows us to set data driven goals and strategies for meeting those goals.

 

 

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION

The Title III Supplemental EL Program selection is based on individual school needs.

·         Elementary Schools: Services are provided in grades K-6 through EL pull-out and/or push-in supplemental instruction.  Students spend part of the day in a mainstream classroom receiving core instruction and then are pulled out for a portion of one or more days each week to receive supplemental instruction in a small group setting or the teacher goes into the classroom and collaborates with the regular education teacher to provide EL supplemental services.

·         High Schools:  Services are provided in grades 7-12 through EL class periods and EL pull-out supplemental instruction.  Students receive EL instruction during a regular class period or some portion of a class period depending upon each student’s individual needs. 

·         Instruction in the EL classroom is based on individual English language proficiency. SDAIE strategies and/or content-based instruction strategies are utilized each year based on each school’s needs and individual student’s ACCESS Test data and IELP Plans.

·         The IELP Committee determines the appropriate amount of time EL students spend in the EL Program classroom after examining the data contained on the IELP Student Profile Sheet.  As the student’s proficiency increases, Title III Supplemental EL instruction decreases.

·         EL teachers and Core teachers collaborate regularly concerning each EL student’s needs. ELs are mainstreamed the remainder of the school day in regular core academic classes and/or special programs such as the career technical program. 

·         Content area and special program teachers accommodate instruction to meet individual EL needs. 

·         Academic accommodations training provided to classroom teachers in strategies for accommodating occurs periodically in large group and ongoing between the EL staff and regular education teacher collaboration on a daily/weekly basis.  All teachers receive  Specifically Designed Academic Instruction in English Strategies, (SDAIE), training each semester as part of the ongoing, sustained professional development plan implemented in September 2007 by BCS.   Also, all elementary teachers have received Alabama Reading Initiative (ARI) training. 

·         All Blount County Schools’ certified teaching staff completed training regarding the use of WIDA Standards developed by the WIDA consortium and sanctioned by the Alabama State Department of Education.

·         Regular education teachers of an EL/LEP students receives a detailed, updated IELP Student Folder after Title III Supplemental EL and Core Program placement is determined by the IELP Committee each year. 

·         The IELP Student Folder is maintained by the regular education teacher.

·         The folder is reviewed twice each grading period by the EL teacher and the regular education teacher as part of the ongoing collaboration necessary for EL student success.  This review is documented and includes student work samples and test samples in chronological order that reveal an ongoing track of progress or lack thereof.  Also, the review of the IELP Folder includes monitoring of the EL Student Progress Report notating accommodations used each grading period, grades received, and appropriate WIDA Can Do Descriptors

·         Student Folder details are also reviewed in school-wide / CIP walk throughs, data meetings, parent conferences, grade level meetings, etc.

 

Many strategies and tools appropriate for ELs overlap with other instructional programs and trainings provided for all regular education teachers and students, such as ARI, AMSTI, and Strategic Teaching. 

 

·         Graphic organizers and color coding of key concepts and key vocabulary offer visual and organizational support for EL students. Color coding is a consistent system of highlighting by color. The key concepts would be highlighted in one color, and the key vocabulary would be highlighted in a second color. Also, the key words in a definition could be highlighted in a third highlight color. By consistently using the selected colors, students learn “what” to look for visually when reviewing content. This system makes academic content more language friendly.

·         Cooperative Learning, (Wood, 1988) is a teaching strategy in which small teams, each with students of different levels of ability, use a variety of learning activities to improve their understanding of a subject. Each member of a team is responsible not only for learning what is taught but also for helping teammates learn, thus creating an atmosphere of achievement. Documented results include improved academic achievement, improved behavior and attendance, increased self-confidence and motivation, and increased liking of school and classmates. Cooperative learning is also relatively easy to implement and is inexpensive.

 

·         The Input Hypothesis explains how a second language can be acquired. It relates to acquisition, not learning. According to Stephen Krashen, the only way we can acquire language is by receiving comprehensible input. That is, we have to receive input that is just beyond our competence but not beyond our understanding. However, this hypothesis was later modified so that comprehensible input was a necessary but not sufficient condition for acquisition. Learners have to have the right environment and circumstances to allow comprehensible input to work. A learner's affective filter has to be low; they have to be free of stress and motivated.

 

·         One Minute Papers provide a quick and extremely simple way to collect written feedback on student learning. Stop the lecture, or at the end of the lecture, ask students to respond briefly to some variation on the following two questions: “What was the most important thing you learned during this class?” and “What important question remains unanswered?” Students then write their responses on index cards or half-sheets of scrap paper and hand them in. The instructor reviews the papers before the next class and clarifies the material as needed.

 

·         Think-Pair-Share allows a teacher to present a concept and then at specific time intervals, stop class and permit students to collect their thoughts (think). A teacher then has students discuss their ideas for 3-5 minutes with the person next to them (pair). Finally, the pairs present their ideas to the class; the teacher or another student can also individually interview pairs using a student conference setting. (share).

 

·         Brainstorming is a good technique for generating ideas quickly. Make sure everyone understands the ground rules: no response is wrong; every response is accepted without discussion or argument. Once brainstorming has elicited a sufficient number of responses, guide students to use their analytical and synthesizing skills to determine the best ideas.

 

·         Concept Mapping is creating visual representations that show the relationship between concepts by using lines and shapes.

 

·         Demonstrations/Laboratories are very good for visually showing and allowing student interactions with various course concepts. Students can be asked to predict an outcome to a given situation and then assess/evaluate/justify if their prediction was valid based upon the laboratory outcomes. In other instances, the demonstration serves to allow students to construct meaning and make connections in their learning based upon their observations and first-hand experience. Depending upon the set-up and size of the class, teachers may allow students to experiment right after the initial demonstration or allow the students to “discover” the content/objective of the laboratory without demonstrating first. It is also “powerful” if the students have access to the materials used in the demonstration and are able to repeat the demonstration at home or outside of class.

 

·         Case Studies allow students to read and then analyze, applying concepts, data, and theory taught from class. Students can work individually or in groups or do this as a think-pair-share activity. Using case studies in combination with a brief in-class writing assignment adds to the students actively working with the subject content.

 

·         Role Playing allows students to act out real-life situations. This helps students understand and process concepts on a more personal level while making real-life connections to the concept.   

 

·         Student Debates/Discussion Panels / Debates and discussion panels can be formal or informal, individual or group, graded or un-graded. This allows students the opportunity to take a position and gather data/logical arguments to support their view, critically. The process also offers experience with verbal presentations. Some lessons may ask students for their personal view and then have the students argue for the opposite position.

 

·         Videos / The use of videos in the classroom offers an alternative to presenting information via lecture. Video length should be relatively short (5 to 20 minutes). Prepare students with reaction or discussion questions or a list of ideas upon which to focus. After watching a video, students can work alone, or in pairs/groups, to answer critical questions, write a ‘review’ or reaction (possibly as a journal entry), draw concept maps, or apply a theory. 

 

·         Games and gaming is utilized in small group intervention sessions, crossword puzzles or vocabulary and spelling, and group competitions can be adapted for academic material and used in student-generated test review and creative, higher order thinking skill design assignments such as Jeopardy Review.

 

·         Technology / The availability of computers in the classroom or media center for student use is limitless. Examples of helpful uses of the computer are reinforcing concepts for the Alabama High School Graduation Exam that have already been taught in classes and in tutoring and mentoring sessions, credit recovery, and student intervention through scientifically, research-based curriculum programs.  Such programs include but are not limited to the A+ academic instructional program, the Academy of Reading and Math intervention programs, Lexia basic skills intervention program, and the Waterford reading program.

2) Describe how language instruction educational programs will ensure that ELs develop English proficiency.

·         Practice of continuous improvement and use of data to improve the rate of language acquisition for ELs

·         Support the LEA provides each school with respect to continuous improvement practices

·         LEA integration of the World-class Instructional Design and Assessment English language proficiency (WIDA ELP) standards with the curriculum

·         Teacher integration of the WIDA ELP Standards in lesson plans

 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

 

Alabama Courses Of Study and World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment

English Language Proficiency (WIDA ELP) Standards

  • Like all BCS students, EL students, are provided with access to the Alabama courses of study and district curriculum and are administered accommodations upon individual need during instruction to master those standards.

  • ELs in BCS receive instruction that makes content comprehensible, which accelerates acquisition of academic language proficiency and literacy. As an EL attains fluency in English, fewer variations or accommodations in classroom activities are necessary.
  • English Learners must simultaneously learn English and content. By implementing the WIDA ELP Standards in the classroom, teachers are able to provide ELs with meaningful access to local curriculum as they progress through the stages of language acquisition.
  • Teachers have been trained on how to incorporate the integration of the WIDA-ELP standards into their lesson plans. This training is reviewed and expanded each year in order to better meet the needs of EL students inBlountCounty.
  • The EL staff performs annual reviews of EL Student Folders with each teacher of an EL student.  (these folders are maintained and kept by the regular program teacher)

      EL Student Folders contain:

Ø  WIDA ELP Standards (color-coded / ACCESS Test – language scores noted)

Ø  Language Functions Page (specific to each EL student)

Ø  Building Student Profile Based on ACCESS Sheet

Ø  Individual Student Goal Setting Form (completed with grade level teachers at data meetings)

Ø  EL Grading Guidelines

Ø  Sample Lesson Plan

Ø  IELP Plans (completed annually)

Ø  ACCESS – Teacher Score Report

Ø  EL – LEP Accommodations Page (individually designed for each EL student)

Ø  Appropriate example sheltered instruction strategies and tools (actual sample illustrated)

Ø  BCS EL Student Progress Report (documenting accommodations and grades)

Ø  WIDA Can Do Descriptors and WIDA Performance Definitions

  • EL teachers maintain an IELP Teacher Notebook which contains detailed documentation for each EL/LEP student.  The forms filed in each individual student section include but are the IELP Placement form, ACCESS Score Report, Accommodations Checklist, conference forms, state-mandated testing data pages, email copies, parent notes, progress reports, and report cards. 
  • These notebook documentation tools are useful in EL program evaluation at the school and district levels.

 

 

Students who are acquiring a new language undergo five stages of language development: Entering, Beginning, Developing, Expanding, and Bridging before entering the stage 6-Reaching proficiency level.   (See Table 2 for the WIDA Consortium’s description of the Performance Definitions below).

Table 2 WIDA PERFORMANCE DEFINITIONS

 

At the given level of English language proficiency, English language learners will process, understand, produce, or use:

 

6-Reaching

·         specialized or technical language reflective of the content areas at grade level

·         a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in extended oral or written discourse as required by the specified grade level

·         oral or written communication in English comparable to English-proficient peers

5- Bridging

·         specialized or technical language of the content areas

·         a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in extended oral or written discourse, including stories, essays, or reports

·         oral or written language approaching comparability to that of English-proficient peers when presented with grade level material

4- Expanding

·         specific and some technical language of the content areas

·         a variety of sentence lengths of varying linguistic complexity in oral discourse or multiple, related sentences or paragraphs

·         oral or written language with minimal phonological, syntactic or semantic errors that do not impede the overall meaning of the communication when presented with oral or written connected discourse with sensory, graphic or interactive support

3- Developing

·         general language related to the content areas

·         phrases or short sentences

·         oral or written language with phonological, syntactic or semantic errors that may impede the communication, but retain much of it’s meaning, when presented with oral or written,  narrative or expository descriptions with sensory, graphic or interactive support

2-Beginning

·         general language related to the content areas

·         phrases or short sentences

·         oral or written language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede the meaning of the communication when presented with one-to multiple-step commands, directions, questions, or a series of statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support

 

 

1-

Entering

·         pictorial or graphic representation of the language of the content areas

·         words, phrases or chunks of language when presented with one-step commands, directions, WH-, choice or yes/no questions, or statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support

·         oral language with phonological, syntactic, or semantic errors that often impede meaning when presented with basic oral commands, direct questions, or simple statements with sensory, graphic or interactive support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) Include the specific components of the LEA’s program of English language acquisition and academic services for ELs.

 

 

EL MATERIALS AND RESOURCES

EL students attend supplemental EL classes that address language development designed for the EL student’s proficiency level based on his/her yearly ACCESS Test scores.  The goal is for the EL student to reach proficiency in English on the ACCESS (4.8), thus he/she becomes independent of EL services and support when doing the work that is necessary to meet the content area classroom expectations. To reach the goal of English proficiency comparable to that of a native speaker of the same age and intellectual ability, EL materials are used that stress the development of communications skills in all our language domains 

Curriculum, books, computers, relevant software, tape players, CD players and CDs, listening centers, pictures, video players and tapes, DVD players and DVDs, games, and numerous printed materials utilized by EL personnel and shared with regular program instructional staff help develop the EL’s English language.  Resources are used to design lessons in the EL classroom to develop the skills needed by the EL class and individuals.

 

The Scientifically Researched-Based (SRB) materials, curriculums, and related resources utilized in Title III Supplemental EL and Core sheltered instruction listed below are utilized to meet objectives in the Title III Supplemental EL and Core classrooms based on the WIDA Standards and AL Course of Study but are not limited to the following:

 

K-2

Waterford Early Reading computer program (SRB)

Harcourt Storytown EL and intervention components (SRB)

A+ Core computer program (SRB)

AcademyofReadingintervention computer program (SRB)

AcademyofMathintervention computer program (SRB)

Into English EL Curriculum (SRB)

AR  / STAR  (SRB)

Leap Frog Pads/Mats

Q Phonics

Rosetta Stone Language-computer program (SRB)

Lexia skills computer program (SRB)

Mainstream classroom support (SRB)

Internet research by subject

Books

Tapes

Computers/ whiteboards/document cameras/etc.

Websites (www.starfall.com , www.usalearns.org and Websites related to topics covered in EL class)

 

3rd – 6th

Harcourt Storytown EL and intervention components (SRB)

MacMillan Treasures EL and intervention component (SRB)

Waterfordcomputer program (SRB)

A+ Core computer program (SRB)

AcademyofReadingintervention computer program (SRB)

AcademyofMathintervention computer program (SRB)

Leap Frog Pads/Mats

Q Phonics

AR / STAR (SRB)

Rosetta Stone-computer program (SRB)

Lexia for Older Students-Computer Program (SRB)

Into English EL Curriculum (SRB)

High Point EL Curriculum (SRB)

Mainstream classroom support

English/Spanish Dictionaries

Internet research by subject

Books

Tapes

Computers / whiteboards / document cameras/etc.

Websites (www.starfall.com , www.usalearns.org and Websites related to topics covered in EL class)

7th – 12th

Rosetta Stone– computer program (SRB)

High Point EL Curriculum (SRB)

A+ Core computer program (SRB)

AcademyofReadingintervention computer program (SRB)

AcademyofMathintervention computer program (SRB)

Q Phonics

NewOxfordPicture Dictionary

Spanish/English Dictionaries

Mainstream classroom support 

Internet research by subject

Books

Tapes

Computers (assignments that relate to topics and enhance computer skills)

STAR and AR (SRB)

Websites (USA Test Prep; USA Geography) (map practice)

Websites related to topics covered in EL class); www.usalearns.org

 

The EL Staff continually seeks additional resources and equipment to enhance the system’s Title III Supplemental EL Program.  EL materials and resources are high quality and support the district’s goal for high academic achievement for all students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) Describe the grading and retention policy and procedures; ELs cannot fail or be retained if language is the barrier.

 

GRADING AND RETENTION POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR ELS

  • Retention of ELs shall not be based upon level of English language proficiency (Section I, Part G, and Guidelines to Satisfy Legal Requirements of Lau v. Nichols).  Lack of ability to read and write in English cannot be the basis for an “F.”  It is against the law to fail a student because he/she is not proficient in English.
  • A grade of “F” cannot be assigned to an EL student without full documentation of accommodations having been made to assure the student full access to the content of the academic program.
  • The opportunity is given to earn credits toward graduation is for 9th through 12th grade students.  Student grades reflect work done with accommodations and are noted in the IELP Student Folder for each class. CREDIT RECOVERY is available for all students needing to make up graduation credits
  • Traditional procedures for assigning grades to students may not be appropriate for ELs at the lowest proficiency level. The same methods and criteria applied to their English speaking age and/or grade level peers should not be the same as to assess students who lack English language proficiency. 
  • Teachers are encouraged to maintain high expectations for student learning and are to accommodate and to adapt lessons and assignments so that ELs can progress in the content and second language acquisition. Accommodated assessments help ELs demonstrate their knowledge and skills.

Prior to considering retention of an EL, the following points should be addressed by the IELP Committee.

Ø     What is the student’s level of English language proficiency?

Ø     Have IELP Plan and IELP Student Folder(s) been implemented and reviewed regularly to

             document classroom accommodations and student progress?

Ø     To ensure meaningful participation, are classroom accommodations being made in the areas      

             of:

o   teacher lesson delivery?

o   activities and assignments?

o   homework?

o   formal and informal assessments (e.g., quizzes and tests)?

Ø     How much individual English language development instruction is the student receiving during       

             the school day?

Ø     Has an alternate grading strategy been implemented (e.g., a portfolio, checklist, teacher

Ø     observation, or rubric assessment on content and language objectives)? 

Ø     Has the student’s classroom teacher been adequately trained concerning instruction and  

                        assessment strategies specifically designed for students learning English?

Ø     Do the teachers note accommodations on homework, class assignments, and tests?

Teachers follow these guidelines:

  • ELs must receive accommodation of content work when needed.
  • Base grading of accommodated work upon individual needs.
  • The lack of English language proficiency cannot be the basis for an EL receiving an “F.”
  • Grades placed in a student’s cumulative folder must reflect the student’s academic achievement on grade level academic content and student academic achievement standards.
  • Assign an achievement grade to students demonstrating knowledge and skills in a particular subject, i.e., math.

 

5) Include the specific staffing and other resources to be provided to limited-English proficient students under the LEA’s English language instruction educational program. As with other instructional personnel, ESL staff must be qualified with academic preparation in English-as-a-second-language, as stipulated in the 1991 Office of Civil Rights (OCR) Memorandum.

·         Qualified personnel (ESL licensure)

·         ESL staff development

·         Content teacher and administrator staff development

QUALIFIED PERSONNEL 

The number of staff employed in the district in the ESL Program will be based on several criteria.  The number of ELs, the level of English proficiency of the ELs, the achievement level of the students, the grade level of the students, and other programs in effect at the individual schools are the major considerations for determining EL Staff employment.

 

All teachers in BCS are fluent in English and have written and oral communication skills.  English fluency is considered established if personnel have a teaching certificate issued by the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) and have met the highly qualified status of a teacher or instructional aide that is required by the ALSDE.  

BCS certifies that all teachers in the Title III Supplemental and core language instruction program for LEPs are fluent in English (language of instruction in BCS) because all BCS teachers are certified by the ALSDE certification department. Individuals who apply to the Alabama State Department of Education, Teacher Education and Certification Office, for an Alabama Professional Educator Certificate or alternative approach certificate must meet the requirements of the Alabama Prospective Teacher Testing Program (APTTP) as a precondition for certification. The APTTP consists of basic skills assessments and subject area assessments.

The basic skills assessments of the APTTP measure fundamental skills all prospective educators must possess in the areas of Applied Mathematics,Reading for Information, and Writing. These assessments are administered as part of the ACT WorkKeys System.  Oral English fluency is established in the rigorous employment interview sessions conducted by BCS administration.

 

 

This ALSDE certification assessment process and the BCS employment interview process certifies that all BCS certified teachers employed are fluent in all four language domains of English.

 

Recruitment of certified teachers in the area of EL is a priority.  EL paraprofessionals are highly qualified.   All BCS EL staff undergoes a rigorous and verbal interview process before employment to ensure language fluency.  The bilingual paraprofessional employed at present by BCS is a native Spanish speaker; thus, she is fluent in Spanish. 

 

The EL staff is responsible for supplemental English language instruction for ELs.  In addition, they provide assessment, tutoring, and monitoring to EL students and collaboration and training to Core education teachers of ELs. The EL staff also serves to bridge the school and home to make sure parents are informed and up-to-date on school and academic issues concerning their child/children.

 

All ELs will receive their primary, core education from certified teachers through the mandatory Core academic program.  The priority of the EL class is supplemental English language instruction.  Other class support and tutoring is addressed based on the student’s needs.

 

BCS employs a full time bilingual Home/School Liaison to address verbal and written translations for EL parents/guardians as needed.  The Home/School Liaison can be reached at theBlountCountyResourceCenter(205-625-4107).   This phone line is equipped with a bilingual answering service 24 hours a day. Also, two full time EL teachers are native Spanish speakers. These bilingual staff members are also available for translation purposes as needed. 

 

In addition, BCS employs six full-time, highly-qualified EL teachers, one full-time paraprofessional, and one EL Consulting teacher.   Of the six full-time EL teachers, two are native, Spanish-speaking and former limited English proficient students themselves. The EL Consulting teacher has English to Speakers of Other Languages certification and all staff is trained and competent to deliver EL instruction and training.

 

 

 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

 

Professional development opportunities for all personnel are available.

 

Additional professional development opportunities and training occur to address specific areas of need as required.  Opportunities to view relevant videos, attend related workshops, conferences, and/or through contracted consultants provide professional development opportunities.

 

Regular content area program teachers receive training in the instruction of second language learners through workshops, conferences, and/or through contracted consultants.  Teachers are encouraged to request assistance from the EL staff concerning appropriate accommodations for all EL students on an ongoing basis.  Title III Supplemental EL Program goals and activities are included in the BCS Professional Development Plan. EL teachers review ACCESS Test scores, state- mandated test scores, WIDA ELP Standards, accommodations, monitoring procedures, and IELP Plans for each individual EL student with each regular education and special program teacher of EL students annually and more often as needed.

 

Ongoing, sustained EL professional development focusing on SDAIE / WIDA instructional strategies and tools for supporting organizational and visual scaffolding continues to be implemented at the district and school level. Student achievement improvement on the ARMT Reading for LEP subgroup is one goal of this training. The training focuses on the use of graphic organizers and color-coding to teach key concepts and key vocabulary in the content areas. The content teachers will utilize these tools, and the EL staff will supplement language instruction by teaching specifically related skills to ELs in small group and/or one-on-one settings. For example, ELs must use organizational skills and tools to complete the Writing Section of the ACCESS Test by focusing on key concepts and key vocabulary. This instruction and training will aide ELs in content classes and on state-mandated testing as they acquire more detailed language knowledge and complete demanding academic language tasks. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6) Describe how the LEA will collect and submit data in accordance with SDE requirements.

·         How schools are trained to use STI or INOW to code ELs and enter reliable and accurate data

 

STATE CODES FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS AND DATA COLLECTION

 

Upon identification and placement, students are given a code in the Software Technology Incorporated Program INOW. The ELs demographics page in INOW is marked accordingly by the INOW Manager. In addition, the INOW Manager must also mark the English as a Second Language box for ELs. The INOW Manager and the EL Teacher work closely to insure this information is correctly marked annually (and checked each grading period and at any time an EL student is identified or enters BCS). An EL Enrollment Form is completed by each EL teacher when INOW EL codes are changed or updated in INOW. This form is signed by the INOW Manager and EL Teacher and then submitted to the EL Home/School Liaison for record keeping in the BCS EL data base. This EL data base is compared to INOW records each semester to ensure correct information is recorded in INOW and in BCS EL data records. The EL Enrollment form is part of the BCS District Plan, Appendix.  

 

The table below contains codes used by ALSDE Student Assessment and INOW along with a definition of codes.  For State assessment and accountability purposes, the ALSDE uses one coding system for ELs. Similar codes are also used by the ALSDE for data collection from INOW. See Table 1 for a list of comparison of codes. All INOW Managers have been trained on how to use INOW, and the BCS District INOW Manager communicates updates and trainings necessary for accurate INOW maintenance and record keeping.  

 

Table 1-COMPARISON OF CODES FOR ENGLISH LEARNERS

Codes for State Assessments

INOW Codes

Definitions of Codes

Non-ELs

0

Students whose home language surveys do not indicate a language other than English spoken in the home.  These are not students classified as NOMPHLOTE

LEP Year 1

1

Limited English Proficient students who are in their first year in a U.S. school.

LEP Year 2 or more

2

Limited English Proficient students who are in their second year or more in a U.S. school.

FLEP Monitoring Year 1

3

Students who have exited the ESL program and are in their first year of systematic monitoring. These students no longer take ACCESS for ELLs® English Language Proficiency test.

FLEP Monitoring Year 2

4

Students who have exited the ESL program and are in their second year of systematic monitoring. These students no longer take ACCESS for ELLs®.

FLEP

5

Former Limited English Proficient students who have successfully completed two years of monitoring and are no longer LEP.

LEP Waived Services

6

Students who are LEP yet parents have refused supplemental Title III services.

NOM PHLOTE

7

National Origin Minority Student Whose Primary Home Language is Other Than English. These students have a non-English language background but are fluent in English and do not require ESL services.  Parents, however, may need information in their home language.

 

 

English Learners whose parents have waived supplemental Title III services must be assessed on the ACCESS for ELs® English language proficiency test until they are proficient in English with a composite score of 4.8 or above. Students are coded on the ACCESS for ELs® test as having waived services.

 

7) Include the LEA’s method for evaluating the effectiveness of its program for limited-English proficient students (including those enrolled in non-public schools)

·         LEA engagement in the continuous improvement cycle

 

 

 

ESL PROGRAM EVALUATION

 

The instructional goals of the Blount County Schools Title III Supplemental EL Program as stated at the beginning of this document are as follows:

 

·         The Title III Supplemental EL Program allows the EL to increase his or her English language proficiency to the degree necessary to allow successful independent functioning in the regular school program.

·         The Title III Supplemental EL Program also provides the EL the opportunity to reach his or her full potential in the process of obtaining a high school education and to further his or her education beyond high school.

 

The system will utilize both formal and informal evaluation of the program in order to determine progress toward our goal of increasing English language proficiency in EL students.

·         Evaluating the Title III Supplemental EL Program involves collection and analysis of data from the Comprehensive Needs Assessment, Title III EL Supplemental Services and Core Program Evaluations, ACCESS Test for ELLs scores, state mandated testing scores, ALSDE Compilation Report, ALSDE/BCS AMAOS Title III Report, and the BCS ACCESS Compiled Five Year Report. The evaluation will be an ongoing process.

·         A formal evaluation of the ESL program is the Compilation Report for the ALSDE.  BCS collects data from each school at the end of the school year and compiles this information in a report.  This report shows a picture of the program.

 

COMPILATION REPORT

A formal evaluation of the ESL Program is the Compilation Report for the ALSDE.  BCS collects data from each school at the end of the school year and compiles this information in a report.  This evaluation consists of data collected from the individual schools concerning the following:

General Information

  • Student population, by race and national origin for each school
  • Number of limited English proficient students at each school, by grade level, and by language spoken.

Identification and Assessment

  • Number of Home Language Surveys currently on file.
  • Number of students having a primary or home language other than English who are not receiving services (NOMPHLOTE).
  • Number of students whose parents/legal guardian waived English language instruction educational program student services.
  • Number of newly identified students (during school year) assessed for English proficiency
  • Number of new students enrolled (during school year) in the LEA’s English language instruction educational program.

Progress within the Program

  • Determined through the annual  BCS ACCESS Compiled Report (five years by EL student)

Program Exit Information

  • Number of students who exited the program
  • Number of exited students who returned to the English language instruction educational program
  • Number of students who received passing grades without transitional services or classroom accommodations
  • Number of EL students in first year inU.S.schools
  • Number of EL students in Year 2 or more
  • Number of FLEP Year 1 Monitoring
  • Number of FLEP Year 2 Monitoring
  • Number of FLEP Completed monitoring
  • Number of retained EL students
  • Transitional services the LEA provided to students who have exited the ESL Program

Staffing

  • Number of certified teachers who teach EL
  • Number of EL certified teachers
  • Number of teachers highly qualified to teach EL (certified in Foreign Language or Elementary Ed. – (not including teachers named above)
  • Number of certified teachers teaching EL (certified in a field other than that above but trained for ESL teaching
  • Procedures used to allocate EL teachers to schools
  • Number of paraprofessionals that assist in the Title III Supplemental EL Program
  • Number of highly qualified EL paraprofessionals

Training

  • Number of personnel who received professional development training related to EL
  • Examples of professional development activities that were effective

Participation in Other Programs

  • Number of students referred for special education evaluation
  • Number of students who qualify for special education
  • Number of students enrolled in special education
  • Number of students referred for  gifted education program
  • Number of students currently enrolled in gifted education program
  • Number of students enrolled in career vocational education programs (high school)
  • Number of students participating in extracurricular activities (sports, clubs)
  • Number of students receiving honors/awards
  • Number of students being served with Title I

Communication

  • How many interpreters provide assistance to LEAs in parent/guardian communications
  • Languages the LEA is able to interpret
  • Location above list is maintained
  • Describe community activities conducted and list resources in the community that are available to provide services
  • Describe efforts and activities to involve parents/guardians in the educational process
  • Research-based EL materials utilized to implement the Title III Supplemental EL Program
  • Describe and give examples of how programs and activities are effective

General Comparison Information

  • Number of truancy petitions issued for students in the LEA
  • Number of seniors who graduated
  • Number of students in Grades K-2 who participated in DIBELS
  • Number of students in Grades 5, 7, & 10 who participated in the Alabama Direct Assessment of Writing
  • Number of students who participated in the AHSGE (using same test administration date as for items above)
  • Number of students in the 11th grade who passed the AHSGE
  • Number of students in the 12th grade who passed the AHSGE
  • Number of students receiving supplemental educational services
  • Number of students prohibited or excluded from extracurricular activities based on grades
  • Number of high school students using elective credit for EL classes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8) Include LEA’s method of identification and referral of ELLs to Special Education. Note that the Individual English Language Plan must describe how the school will communicate with the child and parent in their native language. 

 

PROBLEM SOLVING TEAM (PST)

 

The PST process plays a central role in implementation of Response to Instruction (RTI).

·         English Learners may be referred to the PST only after differentiated instructional strategies determined by the IELP Committee have been provided for them for a reasonable amount of time in Tier I and Tier 2 and there is data showing that this instruction has been unsuccessful.

·         ELs cannot be referred to the PST if language is the barrier to achievement.

·         An EL staff member should be part of the PST team when EL students are referred.

·         EL students must be served in the same way as all other students.

·         Although it is a required step before special education testing, it is not used only for pre-special education testing purposes.

EL students may be referred to the RTI team provided they have been and are currently being served with appropriate instructional and assessment strategies determined by the IELP Committee, but continue to demonstrate risk of failure. (An EL cannot be referred to the RTI team if language is the barrier to achievement. Once language has been eliminated as the barrier to achievement, EL students must be served in the same way as all other students.)

SPECIAL EDUCATION     

ELs following normal developmental patterns for learning a new language are not eligible for the referral of special education services.  Cultural and linguistic backgrounds cause ELs to have special instructional needs.  These needs will not serve as a basis for referral for a special education evaluation.

Specific indicators which validate the need for special education evaluation, include:

·         Poor communicative proficiency in the home as compared to siblings and age peers in bilingual environments, especially deficiencies noted by parents.

·         English language development appears to be significantly different from that of peers who are speakers of other languages.

·         Consideration of the amount of time the EL takes in developing the first and second languages.

·         Developmental delays or other at-risk conditions observed of the EL.

 

Referral information may indicate the necessity of a structured developmental history to evaluate the student’s problem.  The information recorded should remove all doubt that socio-cultural factors are the primary contributors to the student’s learning or behavior problems.  Essential factors needed to make this determination may be beyond the referral information required for non LEP students.  Additional pertinent information regarding the EL referral form may include but not be limited to:

·         Identification of a proficient use of native language (e.g., Home Language Survey/Identification, ACCESS or W-APT).

·         The extent to which the EL has received native language instruction and/or English language instruction prior to the referral.

·         Experiential and/or enrichment services for students for diverse cultural and experiential backgrounds.

·         The school’s efforts to involve parents prior to referral.

·         The amount of time and extent of services in an academic program for students who have had little or no formal schooling.

·         Length of residency of the referred student in theUnited States and prior school experience in the native country and in an English language school system.

·         Attempts to remediate the student’s performance prior to referral, including any supplementary aids or support services provided for this purpose.

Testing for Special Education Services

Tests which will be administered to the ELs, will be determined by the IELP Team.  Presentation of the test in the native language of the student presents a clearer picture to the psychometrics.  There will be provisions for an interpreter, if needed.  Personnel trained in the test administration will administer all tests.

SUMMARY OF SPECIAL EDUCATION REFERRAL PROCEDURES FOR ELs

The special education specialist is the primary administrator responsible for the provision of services to all special education students.

 

Procedures for a New Referral

1.      Follow EL procedures for identification.

2.      Typically, a student will have participated in an appropriate Title III Supplemental EL Program for a minimum of one year.

3.      Documentation of assessments, accommodations, and interventions submitted to the PST.

4.      The PST will submit collected, documented information to the system Title III Supplemental EL Program area specialist or the EL resource teacher for review and recommendations for additional support or intervention strategies.

5.      The PST accepts a recommendation made by the Title III Supplemental EL Program area specialist after the documentation of additional support or intervention strategies.

6.      The IEP team will review the referral with EL Staff providing input to the team.

7.      All IDEA procedures guide the referral and evaluation process.

 

Criteria for Assessment

1.      The IEP team will determine with input from the EL Staff evaluations and assessments and secure parental permission for evaluation.

2.      The instrument of choice for intellectual functioning is the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT).

3.      Native language evaluations and testing with an interpreter help the student access a fair testing environment.

4.      Eligibility for Special Education.

 

Development of the Individual Education Program (IEP)

1.      EL Staff will participate in the eligibility meeting. 

2.      EL Staff will assist upon request and review the initial development of the IEP and in subsequent IEPs until the student exits from the Title III Supplemental EL Program and/or Core EL Program.

 

PARTICIPATION IN OTHER PROGRAMS

·         ELs have equal access to the full range of district programs, including special education, gifted and talented programs, career technical education, Title I, homeless, At-Risk, and non-academic and extracurricular activities

·         Students and parents receive notification of such programs available through newsletters, telephone calls, handouts, and informational meetings for parents (with interpreters available).

·         EL and mainstream teachers also encourage ELs to participate in extracurricular and non-academic activities

 

Gifted and Talented

·         ELs qualify for the Gifted and Talented Program by the same standard native English-speaking students quality. 

·         EL’s academic performance in the first language is also a consideration. 

 

 

 

D. ASSESSMENT & ACCOUNTABILITY

1) Describe how the LEA will encourage and hold schools accountable for annually measuring the English proficiency of limited-English proficient students and for participating in the state-administered testing program.

·         Coordination with the LEA Student Assessment Director

·         Communication of assessment and accountability requirements to schools

 

PARTICIPATION IN STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

 

All ELs must participate in the statewide assessment program for accountability purposes with these exceptions:

  • If determined appropriately by the IELP Committee, ELs in their first academic year of enrollment in the U.S. schools, will not be required to participate in the reading subtest of the Alabama Reading and Mathematics Test (ARMT), the reading subtest of the Stanford Achievement Test (Stanford 10), or the reading subtest of the Alabama High School Graduation Exam (AHSGE).

Ø     However, if these students participate, their scores will not be included

               in accountability determinations for reading.

Ø     An academic year cannot exceed 12 months or allow more than one

               exemption from the state reading assessment regardless of the date of   

               enrollment.

Ø     For purposes of participation in the assessment program, ELs, during

              their first academic year of enrollment in U.S. schools, will use the

              English language proficiency assessment (ACCESS) if they do not

              participate in the reading subtests described above.

  • All ELs, whether they receive or waive supplemental Title III services, must be tested annually on ACCESS for ELs® state English proficiency test.

 

Measuring English Proficiency for ELs

  • The Federal Programs Director and staff will evaluate ESL Compilation Data, monitor state assessment results for each school in the system and the data of disaggregated populations (including ELs and former ELs), and communicate results with other stakeholders.
  • The progress of individual students is monitored by the regular classroom teacher, the EL teacher, and/or intervention personnel at least twice every nine weeks. 
  • The information obtained from EL program reviews and student monitoring is used to make data driven decisions regarding instructional plans and practices (at the classroom, school, and district levels), professional development, and changes to the EL District Plan.  The objective of every decision and change is to ensure that students make yearly progress on standardized evaluations and reach the highest possible levels of English language and academic proficiency in the shortest time possible.

 

 

 

 

Accommodations for ELS on Statewide Assessments

  • Decisions regarding appropriate accommodations for EL students must be made on an individual basis by the IELP Committee. 
  • The IELP Committee considers the content and nature of the specific assessment, the level of the student’s language proficiency, and the student’s documented history of accommodations (twelve month history) in the regular instructional program when making decisions about appropriate accommodations for state assessments.
  • BCS uses the approved accommodations checklist found in the Alabama Student Assessment Program Policies and Procedures for Students of Special Populations. 

 

 

 

 

 

2) Describe how the LEA will hold schools accountable for meeting proficiency and Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs).

·         Monitoring and evaluating school engagement with continuous improvement plan

 

ACCOUNTIBILITY

·         Blount County Federal Advisory Committee uses the BCS AMAOs and BCS ACCESS District, School, and Student reports, ALSDE Compilation Report, and ALSDE state tests reading results of LEPs to evaluate and monitor the CORE content instructional program and Title III Supplementary EL program instructional services.

  • When the district did not make AYP for the 2010-2011 school year, a LEA Improvement Plan was written to address the CORE program instructional needs.  A plan for on-going, sustained professional development to implement detailed sheltered instruction strategies in the CORE and Title III Supplemental Instructional programs was developed and included in each school’s Continuous Improvement Plans (CIPs).

            Two key strategies implemented:

Ø  Graphic organizers – offer visual and organizational support for ELs

Ø  Color coding of key concepts and key vocabulary – the key concepts would be highlighted in one color, and the key vocabulary would be highlighted in a second color. 

 

      The ongoing sustained professional development to put Specifically Designed Academic Instruction in English  (SDAIE) Strategies in place is designed to address the reading deficiencies in all grade levels for all EL students in both the CORE and Title III Supplemental services instructional programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL MEASURABLE ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES (AMAOs)

(Title III, Section 3122)

What do AMAOs mean in terms of accountability regarding English Learners (ELs) ?

  • AMAO-A:    Making annual increases in the number of percent of children making progress in learning English (APLA)
  • AMAO-B:    Making annual increases in the number or percent of children attaining English proficiency (EP) each school year
  • AMAO-C:    Making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) as defined by the State (1111(b)(2)(B))

 

 

Table 3:  ANNUAL MEASURABLE ACHIEVEMENT OBJECTIVES HAVE THREE PARTS:

TITLE III  Annual Measureable Achievement Objectives (AMAos)

How Progress is Measured

Amao  A:  Percent of ELs making Adequate Progress in Language Acquisition (APLA) (0.5 gain)                             N count = 10

v  ACCESS  for ELLs                                     State English Language Proficiency Test

AMAO  B:  Percent of ELs attaining English language proficiency (4.8 score)                                                               N count = 10

v  ACCESS for ELLS                                   State ELP Test

AMAO  C:   Meeting AYP requirements for the EL subgroup                                                                              N  count = 40

v  95% participation

v  %  Proficient inReading and Math

 

How are AMAOs for ELs determined?

They must:

Ø  Know the proficiency levels of the ELs

Ø  Targets for annual increases in English proficiency and attainment of English proficiency and attainment of English Proficiency (inAlabama, WIDA ACCESS for ELs).

Establishing Title III Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs)

Title I and Title III of NCLB require the assessment of all ELs’ English language proficiency (ELP) and the establishment of Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs).  An analysis of ACCESS for ELs student assessment data was written to provide guidance and support to states in the establishment and refinement of AMAOs (see Issues in the Development of Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives for WIDA Consortium States by H. Gary Cook, 2007).

 

HOW to determine if the LEA met AMAO Part A

Amao A:   Percent of ELs making Adequate Progress in Language Acquisition (APLA) (0.5 gain) N count =10                      

Table 4 displays annual AMAO A growth targets for districts across a ten year span.  The table shows the proportion of ELs within a district that must make at least a 0.5 overall composite proficiency level (CPL) gain in order to make APLA beginning in 2010.  Each year the proportion of students in a district expected to make a 0.5 CPL gain increases until 2019.

Table 4:  Alabama AMAO A Targets

 

AMAO A Example:

Table 5 depicts a district with 1000 EL students and demonstrates the targets for AMAO A based on those students making at least .5 overall CPL gain based on 2009 baseline data.

Year

Targets

Number making at least .5 CPL gain to meet target

2009 – Baseline

 

1000

2010

42%

420

2011

44%

440

2012

46%

460

2013

48%

480

How to determine if the LEA met AMAO Part B

AMAO B:  Percent of ELs attaining English language proficiency (4.8 score)  N count = 10

 

Table 6 : Alabama AMAO B Targets

AMAO 2 Targets

Year

Targets

2010

11%

2011

13%

2012

14%

2013

16%

2014

17%

2015

19%

2016

21%

2017

22%

2018

24%

2019

25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to determine if the LEA met AMAO C:

AMAO C:  Meeting AYP status for the LEP subgroup in Reading and Mathematics

Other Factors

Ø  Minimum Number of 10 for Parts A and B, and Minimum Number of 40 for Part C.

Ø  AMAOs will apply to all LEAs accepting Title I or Title III funds.

Ø  Number of students achieving proficiency each year will be shown on the report.

Ø  AMAOs will apply first at the school level and then be rolled up to the LEA level.

Accountability (3122) (b)

Improvement Plan:

If the State Educational Agency (SEA) determines, based on AMAOs,

Ø  That an eligible entity has failed to make progress toward meeting such objectives for two consecutive years, the agency shall require the entity to develop on improvement plan that will ensure the entity meets such objectives.

Ø  The improvement plan shall specifically address the factors that prevented the entity from achieving such objectives.

 

Technical Assistance:

During the development of the improvement plan and throughout it’s implementation, the SEA shall-

Ø  Provide technical assistance to the eligible entity

Ø  Provide technical assistance, if applicable, to schools served by such entity under subpart 1 that need assistance to enable the schools to meet the AMAOs.

Ø  Develop, in consultation with the eligible entity, professional development strategies and activities, based on scientifically based research, that the agency will use to meet such objectives.

Ø  Require each entity to utilize such strategies and activities,

Ø  Develop, in consultation with the entity, a plan to incorporate strategies and methodologies, based on scientifically based research to improve the specific programs or methods of instruction provided to ELS.

Accountability:

If the SEA determines that an eligible entity has failed to meet AMAOs described for four consecutive years, the agency shall:

Ø  Require such entity to modify the curriculum, program, and method of instruction.

Ø  Make a determination whether the entity shall continue to receive funds related to the entity’s failure to meet such objectives.

Ø  Require such entity to replace educational personnel relevant to the entity’s failure to meet such objectives.

E. PARENT INVOLVEMENT

1) Describe how the LEA will promote parental notification and parental and community participation in programs for limited English proficient students.

·         Eight requirements for parent notification regarding program placement

·         Separate notification to parents regarding failure of the LEA or school to meet Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs) within the specified time limit

 

PARENT NOTIFICATION

 

According to NCLB Title III, Part C, Section 3302 (a) requirements, parents must be notified within 30 days from the beginning of the school year or 10 days of enrollment during the school year that their child has been identified for participation in an English Language Instruction Education Program. The Home Language Survey and Assessment (s) by the W-APT or ACCESS determine the student’s English Language Proficiency. Parents are invited to participate in the IELP Committee meeting concerning the placement of their child. Program details are provided to parents (orally and/or in writing) in a language that they can understand about the following:

  1. The process of identifying a student as LEP and in need of placement in the Title III Supplemental EL Program
  2. The child’s level of English proficiency.
    1. How such level was assessed.
    2. The status of the child’s academic achievement.
  3. The method of instruction used in the program.
  4. How the program will meet the educational strengths and needs of the child.
  5. How the program will specifically help their child learn English and meet age appropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation.
  6. The specific exit requirements for such program, expected rate of transition from such program into the regular education classroom, and the expected rate of graduation from secondary school.
  7. In the case of a child with a disability, how the program meets the objectives of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) program of the child.
  8.  
  9. Information pertaining to parental rights that includes written guidance detailing: 

 

Ø  The right of the parents to have their child immediately removed from supplemental Title III programs upon request. 

Ø  The options that parents have to decline to enroll their child in such supplemental Title III programs or to choose another program or method of instruction if available.

Ø  The various programs and methods of instruction if more than one program or method is offered by the eligible entity.

Ø  The right to know whether the staff members who work with their children are “Highly Qualified”

The notice to parents is in English and/or the parents’ primary language.  Parents are not required to respond affirmatively to the notification for the student to participate in the Title III Supplemental EL Program.  Upon receipt of written instructions from the parent however, the IELP Committee must withdraw the student from the formal Title III Supplemental EL Program.  The teachers and school are still obligated to provide appropriate, informal strategies to assist in ensuring success for that student’s academic needs.  These students are also included in the annual ACCESS for ELs testing.

 

NOTIFICATION FOR THE LEA OR SCHOOL’S

FAILURE TO MEET AMAOS

 

 BCS provide written notification to parents of failure to make progress on the annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAOs) for any school year.

·         Notification of failure is provided no later than 30 days after such failure occurs. 

·         If a child enrolls in school after the beginning of the school year, the school has two weeks to notify parents of this failure. 

·         Parent notifications must be communicated in a language and/or manner that the parents can understand.

·         Acceptable parent notification forms are available in 22 languages online at TransACT.

 

PARENT INVOLVEMENT

 

  • We make every effort to provide school information in Spanish and translation services are available in both oral and written form. 

  • We assist parents in understanding report cards, assessment data, student handbooks, INOW home, etc. 
  • Parents who speak a language other than English are invited and encouraged to participate in all programs and activities offered in the local school and district as native English speaking parents would be encouraged to participate. 
  • We encourage parents to be active participants in assisting their children to learn English, to achieve at high levels in core academic subjects, and to meet the same challenging state content and student achievement standards as all children are expected to meet.
  • We encourage parents to be active participants in the formulation of policies and plans which affect their children.  They are invited and encouraged to participate on their child’s IELP Committee, BCS Federal Advisory Committee, and other policy and decision making groups at the system and local school levels. 
  • Parents are encouraged to offer their input to the local school and to the Title III Supplemental EL Program area specialists or staff for suggestions to improve the overall EL program.

 

COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION

 

BCS works closely with community organizations to improve communication between EL parents and school staff (Blount County Literacy Counsel, Oneonta Public Library, HOPE House, Adult ESL-through Wallace State, Salvation Army, United Way, etc…).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F. TITLE III SUPPLEMENTAL SERVICES

This section should be completed if the LEA receives Title III supplemental funds.

1) Describe how the LEA uses Title III funds to supplement the core ESL program.

 

TITLE III FUNDS

 

All Alabama students benefit from high quality, research based materials and supplies necessary to achieve local, state, and national standards and courses of study. The core curriculum is delivered in the regular classroom as second language acquisition is occurring simultaneously. Title III funds are used to supplement the core academic program to ensure core subjects and English language skills are acquired as quickly as possible. A qualified EL Staff and professional development is provided using Title III funds.

 

 

2) Describe the method the LEA uses to initiate contact with non-public school officials to engage in timely and meaningful consultation regarding services available to ELs in non-public schools that are located within the geographic boundaries of the LEA.

·         How ELs are identified

·         How needs of ELs are identified

·         How, when, where, and what services will be provided

·         How the services will be assessed

·         The amount of funds/services available

 

 

 

NON-PUBLIC SCHOOL PARTICIPATION AND TITLE III - LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION FOR LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT AND IMMIGRANT STUDENT

 

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) includes private schools students, teachers and parents as participants and beneficiaries in selected programs such as Title III EL Supplemental Program.  The NCLB Act requires that local education agencies (LEAs) provide services to private school students who would, in the absence of private schools, attend the public schools in the LEA.  Each spring private schools administrators are invited to a timely and meaningful consultation regarding services that are available. BCS follows up with phone calls if needed.  Documentation of meeting, such as agendas, sign sheets and letters are kept on file in the Federal Programs office.

 

At this time non-public schools within geographic boundaries of Blount County Schools do not choose to receive any Federal Funds.

 

 

 

The BCS EL District Guide is based on the following resources.

 

Alabama State Department of Education. Instructional Service Division - Federal Programs Section. English Learners (EL) Policy and Procedures Manual -2010 edition – This document is in compliance with the Office for Civil Rights (Compliance Review #04-98-5023) for providing services to students who are English Learners (ELs). It incorporates requirements and applicable references to Title III of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). 







ELL Contact for more information:

Federal Programs Migrant/ESL Home-School Liaison - Amalia Contreras (Bilingual) 625-4107